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Species Page - Xylena nupera
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scientific name    Xylena nupera    

habitat
southern fringe of the Boreal forest region; wide range of open vegetated habitats such as meadows and gardens, less commonly in open woodland

seasonality
emerges in fall, from late August through mid November (!)), and hibernates as an adult before re-appearing in spring, around the first of May in Alberta

life history
Like all Xylena and most Xylenini, nupera emerges in fall, from late August through mid November (!)), and hibernates as an adult before re-appearing in spring, around the first of May in Alberta. They occur in a wide range of open vegetated habitats such as meadows and gardens, less commonly in open woodland. Adults come to both light and sugar baits, but like Catocala moths are probably more common at bait. Larvae are generalists, feeding on a variety of forbs, herbs and gramminoids, also on the leaves of some trees or shrubs (i.e. willow, cherry). There is a single brood.

diet info
Larvae are generalists, feeding on a variety of forbs, herbs and gramminoids, also on the leaves of some trees or shrubs (i.e. willow, cherry).

range
Nupera occurs in Canada from Newfoundland to Vancouver Island. In Alberta it is widespread in the parklands, extending west to the edge of the mountains (Nordegg) and south well into the arid grasslands region. It appears to be absent from all but the southern fringe of the Boreal forest region.

notes
Xylena is the largest as well as the least often collected of the Alberta Xylena species. It is also the only species that is widespread in the arid grasslands region, where it occurs in mesic sites. Fall specimens are much brighter in color than spring post-hibernation specimens.

quick link
http://entomology.museums.ualberta.ca/searching_species_details.php?s=6115



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Specimen Info
There are 44 specimens of this species in the online database
Map Distribution
Adult Seasonal Distributioncreate a collection histogram with specimens
Specimen List (44)
Related Links
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